Investigation 4: Mules and Horses Along the Canal


NYS Learning Standards: 1.2, 1.3, 1.4 (interpreting history)

 

Grade Level: 4-8

 

Essential Question: Why were horses and mules important to the canallers?

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(4.1.A)
[2005.33] George Harvey's Pittsford on the Erie Canal, 1837. Photo by Andy Olenick. Courtesy of the Memorial Art Gallery of the University of Rochester, http://mag.rochester.edu


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(4.2.A)
From William Hullfish's The Canaller's Songbook. York, PA: The American Canal and Transportation Center, 1984. p. 80-81. Courtesy of William Hullfish


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(4.2.B)
From William Hullfish's The Canaller's Songbook. York, PA: The American Canal and Transportation Center, 1984. p. 60-61. Courtesy of William Hullfish


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(4.3.A)
[40.332.880] From the Albert R. Stone Negative Collection, Rochester Museum & Science Center, Rochester, NY


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(4.4.A)
From Jacob Abbott's Marco Paul's Travels on the Erie Canal. New York: Harper & Brothers, 1852. p. 173-174. Courtesy of the Department of Rare Books and Special Collections, University of Rochester Library


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(4.4.B)
"The hoggee's job was not without its risks. There is a story of a 19-year-old hoggee in Jordan who was seriously injured when the line to his team was caught under another boat. In an effort to save the team from being being drawn into the canal, he unsnapped the hook and line, which then flew back and struck him in the abdomen."

From the Erie Canal Museum's Erie Canal. Images of America. Charleston, S.C.: Arcadia Publishing Company, 2001. p. 108. Courtesy of the Erie Canal Museum


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(4.4.C)
From Jacob Abbott's Marco Paul's Travels on the Erie Canal. New York: Harper & Brothers, 1852. p. 168-169. Courtesy of the Department of Rare Books and Special Collections, University of Rochester Library


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(4.4.D)
From Always Know Your Pal: Children on the Erie Canal, edited by Debbie J. Stack and Donald A. Wilson. Syracuse, NY: Erie Canal Museum, 1993. p. 42-43. Courtesy of the Erie Canal Museum


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(4.4.E)
From Always Know Your Pal: Children on the Erie Canal, edited by Debbie J. Stack and Donald A. Wilson. Syracuse, NY: Erie Canal Museum, 1993. p. 43. Courtesy of the Erie Canal Museum


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(4.4.F)
From Always Know Your Pal: Children on the Erie Canal, edited by Debbie J. Stack and Donald A. Wilson. Syracuse, NY: Erie Canal Museum, 1993. p. 43. Courtesy of the Erie Canal Museum


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(4.4.G)
From Always Know Your Pal: Children on the Erie Canal, edited by Debbie J. Stack and Donald A. Wilson. Syracuse, NY: Erie Canal Museum, 1993. p. 43. Courtesy of the Erie Canal Museum


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(4.5.A)
From Gideon Miner Davison's The Traveler's Guide Through the Middle and Northern States and the Provinces of Canada. Saratoga Springs, NY: G.M. Davison, 1833. p. 232-233. Courtesy of the Department of Rare Books and Special Collections, University of Rochester Library


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(4.6.A)
From Canfield & Warren's Directory of the City of Rochester, For 1845-6. Rochester: Canfield & Warren, 1845. p. 32, Advertisements Section. Courtesy of the Schuyler C. Townson Library, Rochester Museum & Science Center, Rochester, NY

Activity 4.1: What Do You See?

Document 4.1.A: Pittsford on the Erie Canal by George Harvey


    1. Describe the scene - use as many details as you can.
    1. This is a painting - why do you think the artist chose these details?
    1. What type of mood does the artist portray?
    1. What animals do you see? What do you notice about them?

Activity 4.2: What Can We Learn From Songs?

Document 4.2.A: My Old Canal Mule songsheet
Document 4.2.B: Attend All Ye Drivers songsheet


    1. Work with a partner and read through the song lyrics and name three ways the songs are different.
    1. Name two ways that the songs are similar.
    1. What do you know about mules and horses? Share and compare your findings with other members of your team.
    1. What do the songs tell you about life on the canal for people and their horses and mules?

Activity 4.3: What is Happening in This Picture?

Document 4.3.A: Albert R. Stone photograph


    1. Describe the scene - use as many details as you can.
    1. Tell a story about this picture. Pick a point of view of one of the beings in the picture (people or animal) and use the details you have listed.

Activity 4.4: What Questions Do You Have?

Document 4.4.A: Text from Marco Paul's Travels ( 1845, p. 173-174 )
Document 4.4.B: Photo of mules along the canal
Document 4.4.C: Text from Marco Paul's Travels ( 1845, p. 168-169 )
Document 4.4.D: Text from Always Know Your Pal
Document 4.4.E: Text from Always Know Your Pal
Document 4.4.F: Text from Always Know Your Pal
Document 4.4.G: Text from Always Know Your Pal


    1. By studying these documents, what do you know about the life of a mule driver (hoggee)?
    1. What about the life of a mule or horse on the canal?
    1. What would you like to know?

Activity 4.5: Why is it Important to Know About Transportation?

Document 4.5.A: Text from The Traveller's Guide


    1. What does this passage tell you about traveling on the Canal?
    1. Why do you think there was a difference in the rate of speed for commodities (goods) compared to the rate of speed for passengers?
    1. Why is it important for us to know about transportation rates/times today?

Activity 4.6: How Can You Express What You Have Learned About Life on the Canal?

Document 4.6.A: 1845 advertisement


    1. After looking at the example of an advertisement from the 1800s, script an advertisement to sell horses or mules for use on the canal.

Assessment:

Write your answer to the essential question: Why were horses and mules important to the canallers?